By VIANCA GAMBOA

tribute for departed frontliners - In Memory of Heroes

One of the saddest things to happen in the fight against a pandemic, or what we’re going through now, is losing frontliners and those needed in the escalating crisis. No one was prepared for the pandemic., not the WHO, not the CDC, not the doctors, not the health workers.

While half the world was working from home, or busy twiddling their thumbs, finding ways to kill boredom, resting—healthcare workers are on the frontlines. It’s easy to say that it’s their job but,  imagine fighting tirelessly for other people’s lives that your own health and personal battle with the disease takes a backseat and, before you know it, you’re losing. This must be what our fallen doctors—four out of the 33 deaths reported in the country—had to endure in their commitment to other people’s welfare. We pay homage to these heroes and their memory, so every one of us can keep fighting. Remember their names.

Raul D. Jara, M.D. 
Raul Jara was a renowned cardiologist from the Philippine Heart Center. He was past president of the Philippine Heart Association, and an esteemed consultant at the UP-PGH. He was also a household name at the medical academic field for his brand of excellence and stern mentorship, which had inspired his students to be as passionate as he was.

Israel Bactol, MD 
Israel Bactol, the young cardiologist of the Philippine Heart Center, was known to be “promising and brilliant.” The association’s statement on his passing read “He is a casualty of this war. We honor him as he lost his young life while fulfilling his duties as a doctor, a young cardiologist, and a dedicated member of PHA.”

Rose Pulido, MD
As a medical oncologist (cancer doctor) from San Juan de Dios Hospital, Rose Pulido had a passion for caring and giving service to those who suffered a life-altering chronic disease.

Gregorio Macasaet III, MD
Greg Macasaet’s colleagues from Manila Doctors Hospital said he was “one of the best anesthesiologists in the country.” But for those family members, patients, and people who knew him beyond his work, he was also “selfless,” “dedicated,” “brave,” and “humble.”

 

 

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