LINGAYEN, Pangasinan (PNA) – The Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO) has raised the blue alert in Pangasinan as typhoon Ulysses moved closer toward the Quezon-Aurora area Wednesday morning.

img20201111112230 - Blue alert raised in Pangasinan
Dark skies loom above but there is still no rain as of noon Wednesday (Nov. 11, 2020) in the town of Malasiqui in Pangasinan. Storm signal no. 3 was raised in the province due to Typhoon Ulysses. (Photo by Hilda Austria via PNA)

PDRRMO weather monitoring staff Pia Flores said their office and other concerned government agencies, both local and national, have conducted a pre-disaster risk reduction assessment meeting.

“They have met for the possible deployment of assets and manpower as ‘Ulysses’ might affect our weather system in the province,” she said in an interview.

Pangasinan is now under storm signal no. 3.

“Water assets, such (as) motorboats among other equipment, are on standby while the Local Disaster Risk Reduction Management Councils (LDRRMC) in the local government units have been alerted especially the coastal areas, to prepare as the typhoon might bring strong winds and rains,” she added.

Gale warnings were up in the province prior to the arrival of “Ulysses” as the tail-end of cold-front has been affecting the oceans in the past days causing high waves up to 4.5 meters and fisherfolk were discouraged to venture into the sea.

Governor Amado Espino III on Wednesday issued memorandum no. 2020-04, addressing all local chief executives in the province and LDRRMC chairpersons.

“Place all available personnel and equipment on standby in preparation for the effects of Ulysses. Strictly monitor high-risk areas, inform communities in high-risk areas (people living alongside riverbanks, landslide-prone, flash flood prone, and storm surge-prone areas) about possible threats and prepare for pre-emptive evacuation,” the memorandum read.

In a separate interview, Raymund Bañaga, president of the Seven Barangays of Mangatarem Irrigators Association, said they have removed excess water from their rice fields in preparation for the typhoon.

“Our crops are now at the flowering stage. If it rains hard due to the typhoon, our crops might bend down, but at least it will not be submerged that much. We hope and pray that the typhoon will not bring much wind as strong winds threaten our crop,” he said.

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